2-on-1 with Boyd Martin

Like the rest of us, our idols pull on their breeches one leg at a time.  Occasionally, we get personal with one of them.

In this edition of “2-on-1,” we connected with Boyd Martin, one of Three Day Eventing’s top 4* riders, and a representative of the United States on both the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Equestrian teams. Born to an Australian father and American mother who both competed in Winter Olympics themselves, it seems that Boyd was destined to be an athletic superstar, and he did not disappoint.

Boyd currently resides in Cochranville, PA with his wife, Silva, a Grand Prix dressage rider, and their son, Nox.  During the off-season, he travels the world as a renowned clinician, and is known for his relatable teaching, quick wit, and easygoing smile.

As a fan favorite, and subject of features in both Sports Illustrated and The New York Times, Boyd is no stranger to an interview.  We promised no questions about horses, but were delighted to find that he was happy to discuss them anyway — proof that being horse crazy is not gender specific.

1. If you could travel somewhere that did not involve a horse show, where would it be?
The Lochinvar Hotel in the Hunter Valley of New South Wales, Australia, which is right around the corner from the NSW Equestrian Center, where I lived for eight years.
2. You drop a quarter in the jukebox to listen to ….
“Eye of the Tiger,” from the Rocky soundtrack.
3. Your greatest fear is … 
Failing or coming up short when I’m on a team representing the USA.
4. The first thing you think of when you wake up in the morning is … 
Basically what the training schedule will be for all the horses. The first half hour in the morning drinking coffee I’m making a plan for each horse, ensuring that it’s individualized and they’re on their own journey and what we’re doing with them that day will help them prepare for their goal.
5. The best gift you ever received was …
My son, Nox.
6.  The best gift you ever gave was …
The pink scooter that I just gave my wife Silva for her birthday.
7.  Your #1 pet peeve is … 
Standing in a queue. I suffer from ADD and waiting is tortuous. At the grocery store or whatever, I’m quite impatient.
8.  If you were not a professional rider you would be a …
Pro gambler.
9.  What is your greatest indulgence?
Spending time with my cats, Kostya and Manny, lying in bed, which unfortunately usually leads to an argument with Silva if they take up too much space.
10.  Which talent would you most like to have?
The talent of never injuring a horse. My biggest source of frustration is horse injuries. If there was a way of somehow being blessed with being able to never injure a horse I’d be the happiest man in the world.
11. What is your most treasured (not living) possession?
Probably the farm that Silva and I purchased in Cochranville, PA. To us it’s a huge sense of pride having this piece of property that we purchased through our passion for horses and we take huge pride and enjoyment in always building something new, planting a tree or improving something. It’s a little bit of a hobby seeing how nice we can make the property that we both call our home and our business.
12. What is your life’s mantra, or a phrase you use often?
Without struggle there’s no progress.
13. Any advice to your 20-something year-old self?
Be nice to people on your way up because you’ll meet them on your way down.
14. You have to quickly teach us something we don’t know.  What is it?
The art of staying optimistic: in the sport of eventing and training horses every day there are small setbacks in everything. You can’t let it get you down, you’ve got to keep soldiering on and believing everything is going to be okay. This is a hard thing with horses; it seems that everything that can go wrong, will. You may feel like you’re the only person struggling but I can assure you everyone else trying this crazy sport is feeling the same way.
15.  A fox hunter, a dressage rider, and a cowboy walk into a bar.  What happens next? 
I think they all sit down and have a beer together, each giggling to themself at their company’s idea of how to train a horse. Then they look out the window and all start laughing at the event rider, who is still outside working.

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2017-10-20T08:56:27+00:00 October 20th, 2017|Barn|0 Comments

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